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Taylor Swift Rumored To Be Launching Her Own Streaming Service

In 2014, Taylor Swift decided to remove her music from Spotify, saying that in her opinion, "the value of an album is, and will continue to be, based on the amount of heart and soul

In 2014, Taylor Swift decided to remove her music from Spotify, saying that in her opinion, “the value of an album is, and will continue to be, based on the amount of heart and soul an artist has bled into a body of work, and the financial value that artists (and their labels) place on their music when it goes out into the marketplace.” One year later, she held off on adding her fifth album, 1989, to Apple Music after their three-month trial run that would result in no funds going to writers, producers, or artists during that period. “I find it to be shocking, disappointing, and completely unlike this historically progressive and generous company,” she wrote at the time.

 

While her music has since been added to streaming services, her defiance appears to be manifesting itself in a different way: a streaming service of her own.

 

According to TMZ, Taylor Swift is looking to start a site that will feature “non-downloadable multi-media content in the nature of audio recordings.” The site might not just be for streaming, though; the documents that feature her plan for a streaming service also include talk of a line of guitars, guitar picks, straps, and drumsticks, as well as plans to organize retreats, educational camps, and self-guided online courses.

 

TMZ is saying that said site might be called “Swifties,” which I guess works if you’re a fan of Taylor Swift like that.

 

The question is, will this be that big of a game-changer? There’s no doubt that diehard Taylor Swift fans will be all about a one-stop shop for everything Swift (hell, it’s what the Kardashians have done with their apps). But most consumers like the ability to get everything in one spot, right? Will Swift, at the very least, need to maintain having her music on the more recognized services like Apple Music and Spotify just to satisfy the demand?

 

Or, on the flipside, could this be the beginning of more artists (and even labels) taking the “Swift” approach and Kickstarting their own singular streaming services for their acts and/or brands?

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